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12 Health Benefits & Types of Magnesium



Known as "the master mineral," magnesium is responsible for more than 300 metabolic processes in the body. Magnesium is a smooth muscle relaxant, which helps with symptoms including: calcium deficiency, poor heart health, muscle cramps, tremors, nausea, high blood pressure, and respiratory illness. These symptoms can be seen in those that are deficient in any form of magnesium. Stress and living in high stress

situations leave your body depleted in magnesium, adding a diet low in magnesium rich foods and poor gut health will make deficiency worse. (Foods rich sources of magnesium are: greens, nuts, seeds, dry beans, whole grains, wheat germ, wheat and oat bran.)


1. Lowers Blood Pressure

Increasing magnesium intake can decrease blood pressure. Experts link high blood pressure to heart disease and stroke. In one study, magnesium supplements lowered blood pressure for hypertensive people. Results show that magnesium supplements may reduce blood pressure in those already suffering from high blood pressure but may not affect those with normal levels.


2. Improves Digestive Health

Magnesium may help prevent and relieve constipation thanks to its ability to relax the intestinal muscles, thereby allowing for smoother movement of food and waste through the gut. Magnesium also attracts water to the intestines, which softens stool for easier elimination. Doctors may recommend magnesium supplements to people who experience chronic constipation or prescribe a laxative with magnesium in it. Magnesium oxide has more laxative benefits than other forms.


3. Reduces Risk of Diabetes

For those with metabolic syndrome or pre-diabetes, increasing magnesium may help prevent full-blown type-2 diabetes. Magnesium helps regulate blood sugar levels by reducing insulin resistance. Several studies report a link between magnesium deficiency and type 2 diabetes. In one study, people with diabetes who took magnesium supplements experienced improved blood sugar levels.


4. Ease Anxiety and Depression

There is a well-known link between magnesium deficiency and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Since magnesium plays a major role in brain function and mood, people who do not have enough magnesium can experience mild anxiety or depression. During times of significant stress, the magnesium supply is used up more quickly by the body, leading to even more stress. Keep in mind that magnesium may help improve anxiety and depression specifically linked to magnesium deficiency.


5. Improves Cardiovascular Health

The heart muscle also benefits from magnesium, which helps regulate heartbeat and protects the organ from stress. Many stressors, such as muscle cramps, indigestion, pain, and even constipation, can influence the health of the cardiovascular system, and all these conditions may improve with magnesium. The mineral may also help lower cholesterol and blood pressure, two leading contributors to heart attack risk. Additionally, rapid administration of magnesium after a heart attack reduces the risk of mortality and is sometimes used to treat congestive heart failure by reducing irregular heartbeat.


6. Soothe Asthma Symptoms

Magnesium contributes to relaxing the muscles of the airway. People with asthma can benefit from increasing their magnesium intake. Patients in the hospital for respiratory distress are sometimes given magnesium to ease gasping or wheezing. The mineral is even available in intravenous or nebulized forms for those who require more intensive treatment. The anti-inflammatory properties of magnesium can help soothe chest tightness when asthma acts up, and these effects can also ease anxiety.


7. Builds Healthy Bones

Magnesium is essential for bone formation. It regulates calcium levels and activates vitamin D synthesis in the kidneys. The bones store more than fifty percent of the magnesium in the body. Studies indicate that the higher one's magnesium intake, the greater their bone mineral density. Those who get enough magnesium throughout their lives are at a lower risk of developing osteoporosis. This is especially important for older, post-menopausal women, as magnesium levels in the bones decrease as they age.


8. Eases Muscle Cramps

Magnesium is a muscle relaxant. People who experience muscle spasms could have mild magnesium deficiencies and benefit from an increase. The mineral can also help alleviate cramps following trauma to the bone and speed recovery by taking the pressure off the muscle compensating for the injury. Endurance athletes, especially, can benefit from increased magnesium intake. As muscle fatigue sets in, cramps and small muscle spasms can affect athletic performance and lead to injuries during activity. Magnesium is recommended as a treatment for symptoms associated with fibromyalgia, MS and chronic fatigue syndrome.


9. Boosts Athletic Performance

Magnesium supplements can increase exercise performance thanks to another role magnesium plays: disposing of lactic acid. During intense physical activity, lactic acid can build up in the muscles and cause pain. Controlled studies of both professional athletes and casual sports enthusiasts demonstrated improvements in race times and overall athletic performance in subjects taking magnesium supplements. The control group was noted to have much less improvement. Professional athletes and those who work out regularly need more magnesium than sedentary individuals.


10. Reduces Inflammation

Magnesium deficiency can cause chronic inflammation, a symptom of many medical conditions including arthritis, Crohn's disease, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and numerous autoimmune diseases. Sufficient magnesium intake may reduce markers of inflammation. The minerals' anti-inflammatory properties may also help reduce the occurrence and intensity of flare-ups in certain conditions.


11. Reduces Occurrences of Migraines

One of the symptoms of magnesium deficiency is a headache or a migraine. In one study, patients who regularly experienced migraines were given magnesium supplements for 12 weeks. In weeks 9-12, migraine attack frequency was reduced by 41 percent among magnesium takers. You may not have to take magnesium supplements to reduce the recurrence of migraines. Simply upping your intake of magnesium-rich foods could help.As with any chronic medical condition, consult with your specialist or primary care doctor before taking supplements.


12. Increases Vitamin and Mineral Absorption

People who are deficient in magnesium are most likely low in other vitamins and minerals as well. Magnesium helps in regulating calcium levels, and it aids in the absorption of vitamin D. Without magnesium, you would not be able to properly absorb sodium, potassium, or phosphorus. Deficiencies in these vitamins and minerals can lead to serious medical concerns, making magnesium's job a vital one.


Different types of magnesium & their uses


Magnesium citrate

Magnesium citrate is a form of magnesium that’s bound with citric acid, making it a water soluble mineral that is used and removed from the body.

This acid is found naturally in citrus fruits and gives them their tart, sour flavor.

Some research suggests that this type is among the most bioavailable forms of magnesium, meaning that it’s more easily absorbed in your digestive tract than other forms.

It’s typically taken orally to replenish low magnesium levels. Due to its natural laxative effect, it’s also sometimes used at higher doses to treat constipation.

What’s more, it’s occasionally marketed as a calming agent to help relieve symptoms associated with depression and anxiety, but more research is needed on these uses.


Magnesium glycinate

Magnesium glycinate is formed from elemental magnesium and the amino acid glycine.

Your body employs this amino acid in protein construction. It also occurs in many protein-rich foods, such as fish, meat, dairy, and legumes.

Glycine is often used as a standalone dietary supplement to improve sleep and treat a variety of inflammatory conditions, including heart disease and diabetes. Magnesium glycinate is easily absorbed and may have calming properties. It may help reduce anxiety, depression, stress, and insomnia. Yet, scientific evidence on these uses is limited, so more studies are needed.


Magnesium sulfate

Magnesium sulfate is formed by combining magnesium, sulfur, and oxygen. It’s commonly referred to as Epsom salts.

It’s white with a texture similar to that of table salt. It can be consumed as a treatment for constipation, but its unpleasant taste leads many people to choose an alternative form for digestive support.

Magnesium sulfate is frequently dissolved in bathwater to soothe sore, achy muscles and relieve stress. It’s also sometimes included in skin care products, such as lotion or body oil.


Magnesium oxide

Magnesium oxide is a salt that combines magnesium and oxygen.

It naturally forms a white, powdery substance and may be sold in powder or capsule form. It’s also the main active ingredient in milk of magnesia, a popular over-the-counter medication for constipation relief.

This type isn’t typically used to prevent or treat magnesium deficiencies, as some studies report that it’s poorly absorbed by your digestive tract.

Instead, it’s more frequently used for short-term relief of uncomfortable digestive symptoms, such as heartburn, indigestion, and constipation. It may also be used to treat and prevent migraines.


Magnesium chloride

Magnesium chloride is a magnesium salt that includes chlorine — an unstable element that binds well with other elements, including sodium and magnesium, to form salts.

It’s well absorbed in your digestive tract, making it a great multi-purpose supplement. You can use it to treat low magnesium levels, heartburn, and constipation.

Magnesium chloride is most frequently taken in capsule or tablet form but also sometimes used in topical products like lotions and ointments.


Magnesium taurate

Magnesium taurate contains the amino acid taurine.

Research suggests that adequate intakes of taurine and magnesium play a role in regulating blood sugar. Thus, this particular form may promote healthy blood sugar levels. Magnesium and taurine also support healthy blood.

A recent animal study revealed that magnesium taurate significantly reduced blood pressure in rats with high levels, indicating that this form may bolster heart health.


Magnesium malate

Magnesium malate includes malic acid, which occurs naturally in foods like fruit and wine. This acid has a sour taste and is often used as a food additive to enhance flavor or add acidity.

Research suggests that magnesium malate is very well absorbed in your digestive tract, making it a great option for replenishing your magnesium.

Some people report that it’s gentler on your system and may have less of a laxative effect than other types. This may be beneficial, depending on your specific needs.

Magnesium malate is occasionally recommended as a treatment for symptoms associated with fibromyalgia, MS and chronic fatigue syndrome.


Magnesium chloride

Magnesium chloride is a magnesium salt that includes chlorine — an unstable element that binds well with other elements, including sodium and magnesium, to form salts.

It’s well absorbed in your digestive tract, making it a great multi-purpose supplement. You can use it to treat low magnesium levels, heartburn, and constipation.

Magnesium chloride is most frequently taken in capsule or tablet form but also sometimes used in topical products like lotions and ointments.


Magnesium lactate

Magnesium lactate is the salt formed when magnesium binds with lactic acid.

This acid is not only produced by your muscle and blood cells but also manufactured for use as a preservative and flavoring agent.

Indeed, magnesium lactate is utilized as a food additive to regulate acidity and fortify foods and beverages. It’s less popular as an over-the-counter dietary supplement.

Magnesium lactate is easily absorbed and may be a little gentler on your digestive system than other types. This is particularly significant for people who need to take large doses of magnesium regularly or don’t easily tolerate other forms.

In a study in 28 people with a rare condition that required high doses of magnesium daily, those who took a slow-release tablet of magnesium lactate had fewer digestive side effects than the control group.

A few small studies likewise reveal that this form may help treat stress and anxiety, but more research is needed.


Magnesium chloride

Magnesium chloride is a magnesium salt that includes chlorine — an unstable element that binds well with other elements, including sodium and magnesium, to form salts.

It’s well absorbed in your digestive tract, making it a great multi-purpose supplement. You can use it to treat low magnesium levels, heartburn, and constipation.

Magnesium chloride is most frequently taken in capsule or tablet form but also sometimes used in topical products like lotions and ointments.


Magnesium L-threonate

Magnesium L-threonate is the salt formed from mixing magnesium and threonic acid, a water-soluble substance derived from the metabolic breakdown of vitamin C.

This form is easily absorbed. Animal research notes that it may be the most effective type for increasing magnesium concentrations in brain cells.

Magnesium L-threonate is often used for its potential brain benefits and may help manage certain brain disorders, such as depression and age-related memory loss. Nonetheless, more research is needed.


Magnesium orotate

Magnesium orotate includes orotic acid, a natural substance involved in your body’s construction of genetic material, including DNA.

It’s easily absorbed and doesn’t have the strong laxative effects characteristic of other forms

Early research suggests that it may promote heart health due to orotic acid’s unique role in the energy production pathways in your heart and blood vessel tissue.

As such, it’s popular among competitive athletes and fitness enthusiasts, but it may also aid people with heart disease.

One study in 79 people with severe congestive heart failure found that magnesium orotate supplements were significantly more effective for symptom management and survival than a placebo.


Magnesium sulfate

Magnesium sulfate is formed by combining magnesium, sulfur, and oxygen. It’s commonly referred to as Epsom salts.

It’s white with a texture similar to that of table salt. It can be consumed as a treatment for constipation, but its unpleasant taste leads many people to choose an alternative form for digestive support.

Magnesium sulfate is frequently dissolved in bathwater to soothe sore, achy muscles and relieve stress. It’s also sometimes included in skin care products, such as lotion or body oil.


The bottom line

Magnesium plays a vital role in human health. Low levels are linked to numerous adverse effects, including depression, heart disease, and diabetes.

Many forms exist, some of which may help relieve heartburn, constipation, and other ailments. A Magnesium Complex Liquid is the best way to increase your body's magnesium levels and help reduce symptoms over time. https://nurturenutritionstore.com/products/genestra-magnesium-complex-liquid?_pos=1&_sid=22e6e01c9&_ss=r



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